Equity: Education & Employment

Current Projects

iSTEM Project: An Innovative Hybrid Program for Diversifying and Building Capacity in the STEM and ICT Workforce
Contact: Corey Knox, MS (cknox@email.arizona.edu)
Collaborators: StrengthBuilding Partners, the Pascua Yaqui Tribe, and Lawrence Intermediate and Hohokam Middle Schools (Tucson, AZ)

The overarching goal of the project is to broaden and diversify the STEM workforce. To achieve this goal, the i-STEM project will develop, implement, and evaluate a culturally-driven strategic hybrid program that combines a in-school mentoring program with informal out-of-school science education experiences. Sixty Native American (NA) and Hispanic mentees will be paired with 60 mentors: 30 mentees at Lawrence Intermediate School (3rd-5th grade; 50.6% Native American, 42.9% Hispanic), and 30 mentees at Hohokam Middle School (6th-8th grade; 29.4% Native American, 60.3% Hispanic). Mentors will include STEM professionals (n=15), Pascua Yaqui community and tribal members (n=30), and UA College of Science and College of Engineering undergraduate students (n=15). Mentor/mentees will meet twice monthly (individually or in small groups) and engage in a minimum of five out-of-school informal science experiences over a one year period. The i-STEM program activities will be guided by a culturally-relevant theoretical framework, Funds of Knowledge (González, Moll, & Amanti, 2005). The program activities will be based on the four Grand Challenges for Engineering themes: (1) Energy and Environment, (2) Health, (3) Security, and (4) Learning and Computation.

Visit the iSTEM website at: http://istemtucson.weebly.com

To view pictures from the iSTEM Project click HERE.

To view a Press Release from the iSTEM project click HERE.

To view a March 21, 2013 UA-News piece on the iSTEM project click HERE.

To view a recruitment flyer click HERE.

To view a May, 2012 news piece click HERE.

 

Project CHANGE (Career, Harassment, And Nontraditional Gender Education)
Contact: Thomas Bogart, MPA (tnbogart@email.arizona.edu)
Collaborators: AZ Department of Education & WISE Program

SIROW offers this Nontraditional Recruitment and Retention Program to Arizona secondary schools in partnership with the ADE. The program provided gender equity and nontraditional (NT) career education workshops, training and classes statewide for both secondary school educators and students.  Services include: 1) providing Career and Technical Education (CTE) professional development opportunities and resources to secondary school educators in Arizona; 2) coordinating nontraditional events with other partners that provide opportunities for students to participate in nontraditional academic, technological and vocational experiences; and 3) providing information and workshops to schools and students that will increase enrollment in CTE courses that lead to nontraditional careers.  The pedagogical techniques employed include: 1) administration of in-person NT CTE recruitment and retention workshops and seminars, and 2) administration of two online Distance-Learning courses.  Through these project activities, SIROW assists middle and high school teachers, counselors, and CTE directors throughout the state in increasing enrollment in NT CTE classes.  In conjunction with ADE requirements, SIROW served as the statewide coordinator of information on both gender equity and NT CTE employment and training opportunities.  The Nontraditional Recruitment and Retention Program is funded by the Arizona Department of Education.

 

Love Maps for Middleschoolers

Funded by the University of California Humanities Research Institute. This project aims to engage middle school students in digital activism for social justice. Primarily working with girls and communities of color, our Saturday workshops offer middle school studens an opportunity to collaborate, produce, and use a geographic information system (GIS) social application that enables them to locate, follow, and learn from positive examples of social justice. Focusing on the UA compus, specifically the Women's Plaza of Honor, LoveMaps engages youth in both technology and activism - fostering lifelong engagement and community identity.

Visit the LoveMaps website at: http://www.hastac.org/competitions/winners/lovemaps-middle-school.  

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Completed Projects

Women’s Human Rights, Citizenships, and Identities in a North American Context

Contact: Sally Stevens (sstevens@email.arizona.edu)

This was a collaborative project between six universities; two universities in Mexico; two in the United States and two in Canada.  The purpose of the project was to support student exchanges and two summer institutes.  The exchanges occurred during the fall and spring semesters with students from all three countries participating.  The summer institutes were co-taught by faculty from the six institutions during the summer of 2006 (in Canada) and in 2007 (Mexico) with students from all three countries.  This project was funded by the University of Cincinnati through The Improvement of Post-Secondary Education. 

 

West Regional Equity Assistance Center (WREN) – Region IX Equity Assistance Center

Contact: Sally Stevens (sstevens@email.arizona.edu)

The mission of WREN was to assist public schools in identifying equity issues in the areas of race, gender and national origin to promote equal educational opportunities.  SIROW collaborated with WREN to evaluate the programs and services that the Center provides to public schools in its region (Arizona, California, and Nevada).  The three states in this region are characterized by major demographic changes resulting from immigration.  This region has a large and growing percentage of English Language Learners in schools; has the largest number of charter schools in the country; and has diverse populations with large Native American and rural populations in addition to urban districts.  The resources employed by the Center are nationally significant and aligned with the goals and requirements of “No Child Left Behind.”  WREN was funded by the United States Department of Education through the UA College of Education.

 

The Status of Women in Southern Arizona: Indicators of Equity and Opportunity

Contact: Sally Stevens (sstevens@email.arizona.edu)

The purpose of The Status of Women in Southern Arizona project was to identify and quantify information about the status of women and girls in Santa Cruz, Cochise and Pima counties. The final report assisted in determining areas of focus for strategic initiatives and grant-making for the Women's Foundation of Southern Arizona and to serve as an ongoing, regional resource for information on the needs of women & girls in Southern Arizona. Data sources from over 100 databases were mined to develop indicators in the areas of health, economic status, education, demographics, political participation and leadership, and justice issues. The Status of Women in Southern Arizona project was funded by the Women's Foundation of Southern Arizona.

 

Service Equity Among Female Faculty in STEM

Contact: Sally Stevens (sstevens@email.arizona.edu)

This research project used online surveys and follow-up interviews to examine the perception of service load equity, relative effort, and perceived value of service work of female and male faculty members across three STEM departments at the UA.  The departments include: 1) The Department Electrical and Computing Engineering in the College of Engineering, 2) The Department of Geography and Regional Development in Social and Behavioral Sciences, and 3) Molecular and Cellular Biology in the College of Science.  These departments were chosen to represent the diversity of STEM fields, including social science, life science, and engineering, as well as to reflect a variance of female faculty representation across three Colleges.  This project was funded by UA Advance.

 

The UA-ADVANCE Program: Eradicating Subtle Discrimination in the Academy

Contact: Corey Knox (cknox@email.arizona.edu)

The goal of the UA-ADVANCED Program was to increase the participation of women in the scientific and engineering workforce through the increased representation and advancement of women in academic scientific and engineering careers.  The award allowed the UA to build on more than a decade of intensive work at the UA to identify and address equity issues for faculty.  UA-ADVANCED had three major themes: (1) fostering the scientific and leadership careers of women, (2) promoting responsibility for equity among faculty and administrators, and (3) equipping the institution for sustainable transformation.  The program, focused in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) areas, initiated a series of activities including distinguished lectureships, interdisciplinary grant competitions, education on the role that subtle discrimination and unconscious bias plays in the hiring, promotion, and retention of tenure-track faculty, and developed a unique software program to promote more equitable decision-making in the university environment.  In addition to these activities, UA-ADVANCED has a significant research component focused on the issue of gender equity in the academy.  While each of the three Workgroups included in UA-ADVANCED have an internal evaluation component, SIROW served as the “external evaluator” complimenting the evaluations conducted by the workgroups. 

 

Project FUTUREBOUND

Contact: Sally Stevens (sstevens@email.arizona.edu)

Project FUTUREBOUND: Identification Of Effective Strategies To Increase Placement And Success Of Women In Science And Engineering (Special Focus: Minority Women), was a collaborative project involving SIROW and Pima Community College (PCC). FUTUREBOUND aimed to significantly increase the enrollment, retention, and success rate of women, particularly of minority women, who initiate their studies at PCC and transfer to the UA in tracks leading to a Bachelors of Science degree or a graduate degree in astronomy, non-health related biosciences, chemistry, physics, technology and engineering-related fields.  Mexican American and American Indian students made up a substantial portion of the target population.  The joint PCC/UA program offered career workshops at PCC and a year-long research internship after transferring to the UA.  Upon transfer to the UA as a junior, the student had a choice of diverse research experiences from laboratory work on genetics to fieldwork in local desert habitats.  A research seminar course taught students to present scientific research in oral and poster format, and provided an opportunity to share their research experience with other transfer students in the program.  Workshop, mentoring and career seminars helped to guide participants towards a successful transfer experience at the UA.  In addition, participants gained the experience needed to apply for other in-depth research programs at the UA as well as graduate programs in the sciences and engineering.  Futurebound convened a conference entitled Shared Journeys: Empowering Futurebound Communities, Past, Present, and Future at the UA for university and community college representatives and for Futurebound alumnae.  Futurebound was funded by the National Science Foundation.

 

Reading Our World

Contact: Rosi Andrade (rosiandrade@email.arizona.edu)

The Reading Our World program was an innovative after-school program that includes coordinated literature study groups and field trips to expand literacy through reading, discussion, and relevant social experiences for children K-5.  Reading Our World was premised on theories that reading experiences that are coupled with other relevant experiences such as field trips and discussions afford the learner opportunities to apply and expand meaning.  For example, included in the Reading Our World program is 1) the reading and discussion of a book about the Pima Air Museum, which was then followed by a trip to the Pima Air Museum and 2) the reading and discussion of a book on desert flora and fauna was followed by a trip to the Sahuaro National Park West.  Reading Our World was especially relevant given financial constraints on education; school districts that once allowed for one or two fieldtrips during the school year are no longer able to provide these types of field trip experiences.  The field trip experiences were great equalizers for children whose family’s finances did not allow for this type of learning and literacy exposure.  Reading Our World was funded by the Stocker Foundation.

 

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